I"I want a puppy that is going to be around 2-3lbs grown"
 
"I want a teacup pom" 

"I want the SMALLEST dog you have available" 

"I only want one that will stay really, really tiny"

"I want a POCKET pom"

"Are you pups tea cup or Toys?"

   Above are a few examples of the ONLY sentence I  receive in emails from someone  looking to buy a dog from me. Just the one sentence, that's all. They don't tell me about themselves. They don't say WHY they want a puppy. There is no information on what kind of home they can provide. They don't want to know about me, my dogs, or how they are raised.  Is the SIZE of the puppy the ONLY thing that is important to them?
    I think First they should be asking about the HEALTH of the puppy, and how it is raised, housed, kept clean and most of all healthy. I would think they would want to know if it has had its shots at least, or been wormed. They should want to know about any guarantee offered. This to is vitally important if you do not want to waste your money on an unhealthy dog that will cost you MORE later down the road, in vet bills, and possibly cause heartache all because these questions were not asked.
    I think people should wonder about the personality of this breed in regards to their needs for a new pet and companion. I believe when looking for a puppy all this is more important then just what SIZE the pup will mature at.  Most puppy mills love when that is all that is asked though. It is so easy to claim EVERY tiny puppy will grow up to be a TINY TEACUP. They don't want you to ask anything else. They usually just promote the false size of their puppies anyhow. They will promise you the world, if it makes the sale for them. Saying that a dog will only be 2-3 lbs when it is an adult is an easy lie to tell when all puppies are tiny at the ages of 4-7 weeks old.. So be careful and trust your instincts. Honest breeders will answer questions honestly even if it is not what you want to hear. They don't care if they get you to make an impulse buy, based on false promises. Ethical breeders want you to love the dog you get so they will try to educate you, and  they try to tell you an honest size estimate, and discuss  responsibilities in owning a dog BEFORE you buy one.
   In the last 6 years raising Pomeranians, I have noticed that many people would like to purchase an accessory; a tiny THING to bring around and show off. That is the #1 reason for wanting a tiny dog, a teacup or so called toy dog. This thing (puppy) is not viewed as a loyal companion, or even a friend, they are simply treated as a possession. I do not agree with this practice.  Many make impulse buys and do not fully understand the full responsibilities of owning and caring for a new puppy. There are many things to be considered when bringing home a new puppy like Puppy Proofing your home, make and keep vet appointments, Sacrifice sleep, time, and unlimited patience to Potty train your puppy and to make them secure and happy and well mannered. The puppy will be with you for up to 14 years or more! So be prepared. This is not something to buy on impulse! Puppies are not accessories but friends and companions.
  I do find many reasons to ask about the size of the potential puppy. Some might be interested in breeding, showing, or some may be in limited spaces. However for ALL the above reasons, I am posting these FACTS about the SIZE of my dogs. I am being honest, and I think everyone should understand many of the simple facts so that they will be better prepared when shopping for their new life long companion. Please read. :D

FACT #1
How big is Small?
  Most of those tiny dogs you see at the show are 4 lbs!!  They are tiny, & fluffy, and the cutest things you have ever seen! You may assume they were only 2 lbs. Now you think you MUST own one of those tiny wonders! You want one that small, that tiny. When you begin your shopping, you email breeders asking  for a tiny, teacup, toy, 2 lb Pomeranian.  You tell them you only want the one that will mature that small as an adult. What you don't know is that you just created a false ideal for yourself, and you may not understand the health issues involved in such an unrealistically small unhealthy dog.
     All Pomeranians are part of the TOY class. That means all Pomeranians ideally should be 4-7lbs as adults. Most ethical breeders, do not try to breed for 2 lbs dogs. That is just to small, and unhealthy. AKC states the   'ideal' weight for a Pomeranian is 4 to 6 lbs. (NOT 2!). Isn't that a surprise? In fact anything over or UNDER that is considered OBJECTIONABLE by AKC.  4-5 lbs is actually very small for a dog, and is a good healthy weight. Be careful of those who promise you a Tea cup or Toy dog. Ask how they know this and what they base that estimate on. See more on my TRUTH ABOUT TEACUPS page.
     It is thought that seeing the parents of the puppy will determine the puppies size. However the last three generations (usually the dogs in the family tree you will not see in person) have a greater influence on the overall average of size, then the actual parents do. The parents are just part of the genetic puzzle, but not all the pieces that matter or that you will usually see on site. :D

FACT #2...
How Small is to Small?
  Pomeranian pups who are not 1 lb at 6 weeks are not likely to reach adulthood. Those who do,  are more prone to health problems like heart problems, digestive problems, kidney problems, seizures or death. There are very few HEALTHY dogs that are under 3lbs. Keep that in mind when visualizing your perfect companion.  (see a list of health problems on my Truth About Teacups page)

FACT #3...
Why not breed the 3lb dogs to get more 3lb dogs?
  Pomeranian mothers under 5 lbs are 99% more likely to need a c-cection, have a litter that is born dead, or babies that are to big that could endanger or take the life of the mother and or puppies. Two tiny dogs can also produce fatal teacups ( pups genetically designed to small to survive). That is why many don't breed for unhealthy so called 'tea cups' or unhealthy small sizes. 
  It is to heartbreaking to lose the mother, the pups at birth, or the pups  later because they were bred to be to small.  Occasionally a smaller male is used with a larger female. But a smaller female should not be bred to a larger male.
    I care about my dogs, so I do not BREED for extra TINY pups.  I breed for small healthy dogs.  Occasionally I get very small pups, but I DO NOT BREED for them, nor would I use a female who's is under 4 lbs to breed!  I feel to do so would be cruel and unethical to the dogs I care about.

  So what do I estimate the adult size of my dogs to be?

    I can NEVER, and will never, guarantee the size that any of my pups will mature at. I can however give you my best educated  GUESS, based on the past puppies I have had, and the parents, and grandparents sizes.  My educated guess is based on the parents past litters and what THOSE puppies matured at.  I have had a couple RARE tiny ones mature at only 2 1/2 lbs but that is VERY, VERY rare (and that family waited for 5 months to see if she would be ok to bring  home) and when you buy a dog that tiny, there is risk involved. Most puppies average 4-6lbs as adults. I have had a couple mature at 10lbs, but those, like the 2 lbs ones, are RARE, but both sizes are worth mentioning.
    What you feed your dog has a HUGE impact on the adult size too. So my est adult sizes are based on a healthy weight. It does not factor in table scraps, lack of exercise etc. :D
    If after reading this you feel you must have only a 2-3lb dog, if that is the only way you will LOVE it, Please go try to find an adult dog to adopt. Even if I had one that might be that small, I would rather sell it to someone who will love the puppy 'as is' and not confine and define their affections to the 'size only' of their new companion. If this comes across as harsh, please understand I have been raising poms now for over 6 years. I have seen a lot, and this is said based on my experiences. It is not personal against anyone specifically. :D


How big will my puppy grow up to be ?
How big will my puppy grow up to be ?